Ebenezer Fain[1]

Male 1762 - 1842  (80 years)


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  • Name Ebenezer Fain 
    Born 27 Aug 1762  , Chester County, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    DNA Family Group Peden01 
    Died 29 Dec 1842  , Gilmer County, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • He was a Frontiersman, Indian-Fighter, Revolutionary Soldier, one of the Heroes of Kings Mountain, and a Judge. I requested a copy of his Revolutionary War Pension Application from the National Archives, and it is 88 legal-sized pages. The record contains several pages from his Bible, with birthdates of his children written in his hand. Pension Application number R3421. For a transcription of Ebenezer's Revolutionary War Pension Application, see the "Our Family's Fighting Men" link on my web page. Mike Meyer

      Notes from Frank B. Fain:
      Ebenezer FAIN was born in Chester Co. PA. Records differ on the name of his wife, which was given as Mary Mercer and Mary Black. It is quite possible that she was born Mary Mercer, and married someone named Black before she married Ebenezer Fain. The extensive use of the name "Mercer" in her descendants substantiates this assumption. The marriage record has not been located.
      Although very young, he served in the Revolution and was in the Battle of Kings Mountain, where he was wounded. His pension record states that he was married near Jonesboro in 1781, but it does not state the maiden name of his wife. He lived in South Carolina, and appears on the 1790 Census of Pendleton District. He moved to North Georgia and lived in Habersham Co. where he was a Justice of the Peace. In the Gold Lottery Lists of Habersham County, he was listed as a Revolutionary Soldier. He is reported to have been buried in Habersham County, GA, but the location of his grave is not known. (**note: later research has shown that he probably died in Gilmer Co., Georgia - Mike Meyer)

      Taken from .."MEN OF MARK OF GEORGIA" by W. J. Northen "While his people were resident in Washington Co Va(the area was VA and Tn at different times) and when he was but 14 years of age, Ebenezer Fain enlisted in the Patriot armies for a three month term serving under Captain James Montgomery & Col. Wm. Christian. While serving this short enlistment the boy was stationed at Black Fort & Montgomery Station & was engaged in two battles with Indians in one of which 16 were killed. June 1780 found him serving under Cap William Trimble as a Light Horseman in Colonel Charles Robertson's command. They were joined at Gilbertown by other troops & marched to the Pacolet River in SC where they engaged in a successful combat with the Brittish. While acting as sentry at night during the encampment of the command at Buffalo creek on Broad River young Fain shot John Foulin, a spy on whom was found an express note from Lord Cornwallis to the Tory Captain Moore, urging him to defend his fort until some troops could reach him. The Americans took advantage of this information captured Moore & his fort together with 100 men & then dispersed at Musgrove Mills the party sent to reinforce Captain Moore. At Wofford's Iron Works the Americans were attacked suddenly at night and after a severe struggle were driven back but rallying they renewed the fight & defeated the enemy taking Major Dunlap, the commander, prisoner. Young Fain was afterwards transferred to Captain Cunningham's company attached to Col. Elijah Clarke's Georgia Regiment at Augusta, Ga. Discharged from the service at the expiration of his term he immediately reenlisted in Sept 1780 as a mounted horseman and took part in the memorable pursuit of Col. Ferguson who was overtaken at King's Mountain, SC Oct 7 1780; defeated; killed & his entire command captured, In this struggle, Fain was wounded in one leg. From Nov 1780 he rendered valiant service as horseman under Captain Gibson and Col. Sevier in their expeditions against the Indians who were badly defeated & their towns destroyed. He retired from the service April 1781 and in June 1781 married in Jonesboro, to Mary Mercer Black".

      Shortly before the battle of King's Mountian, in late September, the British Officer Patrick Ferguson camped at Gilbert Town (near present day Rutherfordton). He sent a message to Colonel Isaac Shelby, whom he considered to be the leader of the "backwater men." The message said that if Shelby and his men did not stop their opposition to the British, Ferguson would march his army over the mountains, hang their leaders and "lay the country waste with fire and sword." These boastful words inflamed the Patriots, and would later seal Fergusons fate. The "Overmountain Men" assembled at Sycamore Shoals on Sept 25, and marched in pursuit of Ferguson. They caught up with him on Oct 6, 1780 at King's Mountain. The battle took place the next day and at its conclusion, Ferguson was dead, and all of his men either killed or captured.

      From "Nicholas Fain of Tennessee" by Max Fain: “The battle of King’s Mountain was the turning point of the American Revolution. It gave the interior of the American continent to General Washington, with its boundless, available resources and its room to maneuver. It confined the British to the seacoast and their supply lines. It put heart back into the independence cause. The end at Yorktown was inevitable.
      The battle of King’s Mountain has become a legend. It is often cited as an example of a brilliant strategist in an impregnable position being utterly defeated by the indomitable spirit of aroused men. It is a frustration to professional militarists because it was fought primarily by civilian militiamen on their own initiative, without the knowledge or consent of higher headquarters. Among the world’s most decisive battles, it remains one of the most unique.
      There have been several attempts to compile a roster of the men at the battle of King’s Mountain. None of them can possibly be complete. For instance, one of those killed there was a young boy who had joined the group somewhere along the way and who was never identified.
      Most of the early lists include Samuel and Nicholas Fain. The latest list of participants published by historians of the King’s Mountain Military Park includes Ebenezer, John, and Samuel Fain. Family tradition claims that Nicholas and five of his sons were there. It is probable that they were all involved in the campaign in some way, if not the actual battle. There seems little doubt that Samuel was there. Some reports indicate that Ebenezer and John were wounded, John with a superficial wound from a bullet which ricocheted from a tree.
      It was unfortunate that the army had no clerks to keep an accurate muster and to call roll during the battle, since having an ancestor at King’s Mountain gives almost certain membership in some worthy patriotic societies.
      There is considerable variance among the lists in regards to certain persons with similar names, particularly with the names of men from the Gillespie and Moore families. There may have been three men name Thomas Gillespie involved. The younger George Gillespie was almost certainly there, but it is doubtful if his father was, due to age.
      During their later years, the leaders of the King’s Mountain men became involved in an unfortunate squabble over the conduct of the battle. This was a petty argument, which old age can hardly excuse. But one good result was the securing of many “certificates”, "testaments”, and “affidavits” from men who had been there. These proved invaluable to Draper and other historians. Draper published many of them in his book ("Kings Mountain and its Heroes" by Lyman Draper - 1881), including those of Andrew Evins and Felix Earnest, which are of particular interest to us.
      Genealogical research continues in this matter, and new evidence can be expected. The men of King’s Mountain have long since found their peace, but the battle of the ancestors goes on.”

      Notes from Old Buncombe Co. Genealogical web site: In 1795 Ebenezer was paid by Buncombe Co., N.C. for 25 days work of spying on the Indians. There had been several skirmishes between the settlers and the Native Americans in the area. There are also numerous court records from 1792 through 1796 of Ebenezer serving on Buncombe Co., juries, as well as court cases. He also served as a judge during the 1796 session. See Old Buncombe Co. web site: http://www.obcgs.com/

      Census Info: 1790 Census - living in Pendleton, South Carolina pg 84

      1810 Census - Living in Buncombe, North Carolina. Image 28

      1820 Census- Living in Habersham Co., Georgia. pg 123

      1830 Census- Living in Habersham Co., Georgia. pg 8

      1832 Georgia Lottery - listed as a Revolutionary Veteran - won land in Cherokee County.

      1840 Census - Living in Gilmer Co., Georgia pg 13

      From "Nicholas Fain of Tennessee" by Max Fain:
      "John Simpson Fain was a grandson of Ebenezer Fain. In an unsigned letter dated Morganton, GA., Oct. 5th, 1878, he wrote, "I was sort of favorite child of my Grandfather, and he principally raised and educated me, and I learned to love him when quite a child, and I can never forget him. My Grandfather was a man in the true sense of that word, physically and mentally and morally. His death was calm, and without a struggle. He closed his own eyes, and folded his own arms across his peaceful breast, and died without a groan or struggle."
      Bradford states that he died in Hutcheson County, Georgia. I find no records of any Hutcheson County in Georgia. The book "Men of Mark" states that he died in Habersham County, Georgia on December 29, 1842.
      In the Revolutionary War Files on Ebenezer Fain is the application of John Fain, son of Ebenezer Fain, made on June 19, 1846 before Benjamin Chastain, J.P. in Gilmer County, Georgia to obtian the benefits of widows and heirs of soldiers of the Revolution. He stated that his father died Dec. 29, 1842 and left a widow, Mary (Polly) Fain "who remained his widow till the 11th day of February, 1846 when she died in Gilmer County, Georgia...that she continued to live on the plantation and much of the time at the residence of the desponant (John Fain) until her death". The deposition also lists the surviving children of Ebenezer and Mary Fain.
      The accompanying affidavit by Benjamin Chastain of Gilmer County, GA. states that he (Benjamin Chastain) had become acquainted with Ebenezer Fain in Pendleton District of South Carolina, that he had been a school mate of David Fain, that he had known the family intimately for the last fifty years, and that Ebenezer Fain died at the home of his son, John Fain, in Gilmer County, Georgia."

      from Genforum.com entry # 22 on Fain forum: Recorded June 20, 1829 Jno. T. Carter C.S.C. James Gilliland To The Trustees of the Methodist Episcopal Church This indenture made this twenty-sixth day of June in the Year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-eight between James Gilliland & Elizabeth his wife of the County of Habersham in the State of Georgia of the one part & Ebenezer Fain, Benjamin Crumley, David Fain, Francis Bird, Benjamin Allison, Malchsadic Charles, John Richardson, John Harwell & Thomas Hughes . . . all of the County aforesaid of the other part. Witnesseth that the said James Gilliland & Elizabeth his wife for and in consideration of the sum of one dollar . . . hath given granted bargained sold released & confirmed & conveyed & by these presents doth give grant bargain sell release & confirm & convey unto them the said Ebenezer Fain, Benjamin Crumley, David Fain, Francis Bird, Benjamin Allison and their successors in office . . . a certain Lot or parcel of land situated lying & being in the County & State aforesaid it being part of lot No. 67 in the third district . . . one acre of land more or less . . . in trust that they will erect & build or cause to be erected & built thereon a house or place of Worship for the use of the Members of the Methodist episcopal Church in the United States of America according to the rules & disciplines which from time to time may be agreed upon & adopted by the Ministers of the Said Church at their General Conference in the United States of America . . . Wit: John Butt Senr., A. Vickery J.P. Rec: June 22, 1829.
    Person ID I11461  Peden1
    Last Modified 1 Dec 2013 

    Father Nicholas Fain, Or Fainyance,   b. Abt 1730, , , , Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1785, Jonesboro, Maury County, Tennessee, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 55 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth Taylor,   b. 1734, , , Devonshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1795  (Age 61 years) 
    Married Abt 1752  , , , Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F4482  Group Sheet

    Family Mary Mercer,   b. 1762, Hutchins, Oglethorpe County, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Feb 1846, , Gilmer County, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Married 6 Jun 1781  Jonesboro, Maury County, Tennessee, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Children 
    +1. David Fain,   b. 3 Aug 1782, , Buncombe County, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1850, , Gilmer County, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
     2. Margaret Fain,   b. 6 Aug 1786, , , South Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 May 1870  (Age 83 years)
    +3. Mercer Fain,   b. 28 Feb 1789, , , South Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     4. Elizabeth Fain,   b. 7 Jul 1791, , , South Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 May 1870  (Age 78 years)
     5. Mary Ann Fain,   b. 6 Jan 1794, , Buncombe County, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     6. Sarah "Sally" Fain,   b. 30 May 1796, , Buncombe County, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    +7. John Samuel Fain,   b. 14 Dec 1797, , Buncombe County, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Jul 1873  (Age 75 years)
     8. Rebecca Fain,   b. 10 Dec 1799, , Buncombe County, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     9. Polly Ann Fain,   b. 11 Apr 1804, , Buncombe County, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1877  (Age 72 years)
    Last Modified 2 Jul 2005 
    Family ID F4481  Group Sheet

  • Sources 
    1. [S538] BOOK: Men of Mark in Georgia, Bernard Suttles, (1905).

    2. [S217] LDS: Family Search, (FamilySearch (TM) Internet Genealogy Service).