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28051 Served in the CSA as a private (named William T. Richey, sic) in Captain
Perry Clayton's Company, 30-Day Volunteers. This company was raised in
response to Colonel Borland's call of November 5, 1861, mustered into the
Confederate service on November 9, 1861, for 30 days, and discharged on
December 9, 1861, at Pitman's Ferry, Arkansas. This information obtained
from Bryan R. Howerton, found at
ww.couchgenweb.com/civilwar/clayton.html. Also on this roster were
Isaac W. Armstrong, First Lieutenant; Richard DeKalb Armstrong; Thomas J.
Turner; and Robert G. Richey (sic).
Tommy Ritchie next enlisted as a private on 1 November 1862at Evening
Shade, Arkansas in Co. D of the 8th Arkansas Cavalry (listed as "W.T.
Richey"). At the time of enlistment his age was 37 and states he had
been born in Virginia. He was detailed as butcher in this company on 1
Jul 1863. He was paroled 5 Jun 1865 at Jacksonport, Arkansas. Also in
the 8th Arkansas Cavalry were David Mastin Armstrong (future son-in-law);
John G. Gibbins (future son-in-law to his brother Isaac Ritchie); David's
father Richard Dickson and brother Isaac Huntley Armstrong; and Thomas
Joseph Turner (futurefather-in-law to Tommy's future granddaughter Sarah
Lee Armstrong).

William Thomas "Tommy" Ritchie is my great-great-grandfather. He moved to
Stoneburg in Montague County, Texas as part of a wave of Sharp County
immigrants during the 1870s and 1880s to Texas, including the Ritchies,
Turners, Sandefers, Levertons, Armstrongs, and Padens (who all were or
became interrelated by marriage). The Padens went to Denton ca. 1870,
which is about an hour's modern-day drive from Stoneburg. The Ritchies
went first to Grapevine, in Tarrant County, Texas, also about an hour's
drive from Stoneburg. They were part of a wagon train, and included in
that number was David Mastin Armstrong, a heartbroken young man who was
recently released from having been a Confederate soldier captive in a
Union prison. His father (Richard Dickson Armstrong from Sharp Co.) died
in that Union army prison right at the end of the war. David left his
family behind to go for cheap land and, more importantly, removal from
all signs of the war in what was then the frontier of Texas. On the long
ride from Sharp County to Texas, David struck up a relationship with
Tommy Ritchie's young teenage daughter, Margaret, that led quickly to
marriage in 1874. They both often told the story of how they fell in love
during this wagon train journey.

Margaret Ritchie is an iconic figure in our family. Despite being a shade
under 5' tall, with kind blue eyes, she was made of steel and is likely
the reason me and my generation are here today. The Ritchies and
Armstrongs stayed in Tarrant County only a few years. They heard of free
land, lots of it, available to settlers in the Crosstimbers region of
Texas, which was then and still is wonderful cattle and farming land
(blackland prairie). Texas had been depopulated during the Civil War,
particularly in the counties that were the border between older white
settlements and the regions claimed for millenia by Comanche, Kiowa and
Apache. Montague County (Stoneburg) was such a border zone, and had lost
much of its white settlement during the Civil War because there was no
around to prevent Comanche raids. Texas was offering free or extremely
cheap land in Montague County, the proceeds of which would go to fund
schools in Limestone County, Texas -- hence, it was known at Limestone
County School Land. Tommy Ritchie and David Armstrong moved their
families to homesteads just east of Stoneburg, David by 1880, Tommy a few
years later.David, having virtually nothing in the way of start-up
money, built a "soddie" or sod house in the side of a small hill for
himself, Margaret, and their young daughter Sarah Lee. Tommy and Joanah
Ritch 
Ritchie, William Thomas (I5953)
 
28052 Served in the CSA as a private, under name of Robert G. Richey (sic), in
Captain Perry Clayton's Company, 30-Day Volunteers. This company was
raised inresponse to Colonel Borland's call of November 5, 1861,
mustered into the Confederate service on November 9, 1861, for 30 days,
and discharged on December 9, 1861, at Pitman's Ferry, Arkansas. This
information obtained from BryanR. Howerton, found at
ww.couchgenweb.com/civilwar/clayton.html. Also on this roster were
Isaac W. Armstrong, First Lieutenant; Richard DeKalb Armstrong; and
William T. Richey (sic). 
Ritchie, Robert Gillian (I7852)
 
28053 Serving as a sailor on the USS Fanning (CG-11). Moore, Walter Lee (I16041)
 
28054 She was not on 1880 census with him. Family F9571
 
28055 Shiloh Cemetery, Sharp Co., AR Family F2659
 
28056 Shiloh Cemetery, Sharp Co., AR Family F3470
 
28057 signed by Thomas Jefferson, Governor of Virginia.

Back Creek, a branch of the Roanoke (or Goose) River, north of Bent Mountain and south of the headwaters of Mud Lick and Cravens Creek. This dividing ridge, once known as Marshall Ridge, was the Mason's Cove Community. 
Peden, John Sr. (I5806)
 
28058 So your from the Rome, Ga. line.....My James Alexander Copeland b. 1817 from DeKalb Co., Ala. drove a stagecoach to and from Rome, Ga., ....your bunch was in Rome, Ga. at that time.....I have from info on Alexander Copeland b. 1754 married Rebecca Gilmore.....Had Joseph Gilmore b. 1798 married Sarah Chapman ... they had 10 children I have a Alexander Copeland. married Melissa Saratin..they dad Sallie who married Wall, Elsie married Fuller, Penelopy married Perry, Fannie married Little, James M of Gordon Co., Ga, Jefferson D, William of Walker Co., and Francis married Carrie Hunt, who had John A, Benjamin F, Susan M, Hunt, Francis W in 1883 married Carrie Hunt daughter of Major Benjamin Hunt, who was KIA. They had 6 children: John A, aBenjamin F, Susan M, Francis and Lois R. Alexander the father of all, along with brother Joseph served in the CSA. Alexander grandfather was another Alexander who was born in Ireland and came to America before the Revolution. First settled in York Co, SC and joined the Patroit army. After the war, he settled in Spartanburg, SC and married Miss Gilmore and their son, Joseph Gilmore Copeland was the grandfather of Francis W who settled in McMinn Co., Tenn and married Sarah Chapman and had 10 children including Alexander the father of Francis W.
This info is from the History of Walker Co, Ga by James Alfred Sartain...Alexander Copeland had four sons, married four sister, Chapman's, one of these son, was Joseph G. Copeland (father of Alexander Copeland who settle in Walker Co., Ga. Joseph G Copeland moved to McMinn, Tenn. in 1819. Alexander son, Joseph Gilmore Copeland married Melissa Sartain in 1848, James Aldred Sartain quoted that these are notes, and stated that he had completed this one.
Henry Co., Ga. Tax Dijest 1837
Joseph Copeland, William Sr. and William Jr.
Henry Co., Ga. Tax Dijest...William Copeland Sr of William Jr. on Walnut Creek, South River.
The above looks as if Joseph moved to Henry Co. after 1831 or could have been the son of William Sr., older and paying taxes in 1837.....Could the above help.....

I have information on a Francis W Copeland, laywer of Walker Co., Ga. b....., son of Alexander Copeland b. 08/1824 in McMinn Co., Tenn settled in Walker Co., Ga. married Melissa Sartain b. in 'Spartanburg, SC daughter of John Sartain, they had 8 children as listed above.
Are you from.....Fannie who married a Little (is that one your Frances Rebecca Copeland who married Newton Little....Is that Fannie in that line....really Frances Rebecca who married a Newton....ARe you related to our James Alexander Copeland?....I hoping that your distant relative are related to our James Alexander Copeland....father James Copeland b. 1778, who married the Blackwood.....as you stated.....Here is hoping....Please let me know....Cindy

So you are saying that Cynthia Copeland Paden and Nancy Copeland Paden are sister's of our James Alexander Copeland b. 1817, and you are saying that James Alexander Copeland b. 1778 and Elizabeth "Maggie" Blackwood were their parents. Where did you get your proof, not that I don't believe you but several people on the internets says they are and some says they are not. Is yours back by documents past down through family (relatives)? We have a deed that our James Alexander Copeland stood in as a advisor for a Samuel Copeland, that had got killed in Cherekee County, Ala, 1842.....Cynthia, Nancy, that married Padens, Monroe, the Clayton were mention in this deed of selling Samuel property.....no minor children were involved in these papers, but in a Bible of William Leander Copeland (this is a son of James Alexander Copeland b. 1817 and a brother to our John Tyler Copeland, our great-grandfather) mention a Samuel Copeland who died 1842 and a wife named Sarah.....Mary Coker on the internet, who is working on this line of James Alexander Copeland b. 1817 says and she feel that probably that Samuel was James Alexander Copeland father's.....but other people says that James Alexander Copeland b. 1778 was Elizabeth "Maggie" Blackwood was the parents of James Alexander Copeland b. 1817.....Mary Coker says Elizabeth "Maggie" Blackwood was borned in 1790....Samuel was born in 1798.....So Elizabeth "Maggie" Blackwood was only 8 years old when she had Samuel.....Mary Coker feel that Samuel b. 1790 was James Alexander Copeland b. 1817 father and Sarah was his mother....We have no proof....But if you have the real birth date of James Alexander Copeland b. 1778 and Elizabeth "Maggie" Blackwood.....it would so help.....Have you ever heard of a Jacoway name? A Jacoway name was listed in James Alexander Copeland b. 1778 will....to take money back to Elizabeth.....Do you know anything about this? Please let me know! Thanks again, Cindy

 
Copeland, James Alexander (I702)
 
28059 Source for Margaret (Peggy) Barnhill Military records of Gallant Estes Application for land Grant; Book titled Reminiscent History Of The Ozarks Region, by Ramfre: Will Book, Cannon County Tennessee Vol. A 1836-1895 Microfilm number 1031068 Titled: Estes Family Since 1804 From LDS Archives.

Her son John say's she never married again and came to Arkansas with him in 1849 and lived with the family until she died in 1857.

Source of information April (PaperHearth @aol.com) from a portion of the book SOME DESCENDANTS OF ROBERT BARNHILL I "written by Virgin Barnhill from page 65.

Margaret Estes did marry again on September 30, 1827 to Joel Mears. Joe Mears passed away on December 21, 1835. Presumably at this point Margaret never married again and then in 1849 moved with her son John. Information from George A. Mears (GAMROUNDHILL@aol.com) 8/17/2000. From the 1850 Cannon CO TN CENSUS REPORT MARGARET MEARS 76 S.C. LIVING WITH THE FAMILY OF ANDREW McCABE 39 farmer Bethany 42 William B. 19 Mary J. 16 Margaret E. 14 James H. 12 Thomas A. 11 Parlee A. 6 Charles H. 1/12 Also Andrew McCabe was a witness when Margaret applied for the benefits to Joel's Rev. War Pension. 
Barnhill, Margaret "Peggy" (I12163)
 
28060 Source: Starr Tracks, copyrighted 1989--page 51

Belle Starr married Sam Starr three weeks after her marriage to Bruce Younger. Little else is known of Bruce. Writers on the Younger family have reported that he did ride with various outlaw gangs. A newspaper report would later mention Bruce Younger's body being found in a New Mexico cave where it became mummified and was identified by one of Bruce's sisters, Sophia. The date of his death is not known.

Page 50: Bruce was the eighth child of Charles and Parmelia Younger's nine children. He was also a first cousin to Cole Younger.
 
Younger, Bruce (I14424)
 
28061 Southern Women and Their Families in the 19th Century: Papers and Diaries

Consulting Editor: Anne Firor Scott, W. K. Boyd Professor of History Emeritus, Duke University and author of The Southern Lady: From Pedestal to Politics, 1830–1930

Huldah Annie (Fain) Briant’s papers, 1846–1888, Santa Luca (Gilmer County), Georgia, include the legal correspondence of Ebenezer Fain and the war correspondence of his daughter, Huldah A. (Fain) Briant, chiefly from M. C. Briant, whom she married in 1864. Included also are letters from other members of the family. The letters record accounts of the Battle of Manassas, 1861; enthusiasm for the confederacy in Texas; impressment of a local Jew’s merchandise for the army by women; and refugee families from Georgia. 
Fain, Huldah Anne (I11590)
 
28062 Staff Sergeant, 345 Infantry, 87th Division, WWII Horton, Paul Elmore (I9162)
 
28063 Stella's notes indicate 8 children in all, with names for 6. Family F5414
 
28064 Stella's notes indicate children names as John, Delia, Capitola, Kate and Emma Family F5428
 
28065 Stella's Notes lists children Betta, Wm, Tom, Mag, and Robert.


From 1850 Census

4 290 291 Snider Henry 33 M Farmer 600 VA
5 290 291 Snider A. J. 25 F Ten.
6 290 291 Snider E. E. 8 F KY X
7 290 291 Snider Wm. G. 5 M KY X
8 290 291 Snider J. F. 2 M KY

E.E is Elizabeth (Betta)
Wm G is WIlliam G.
J.F. is ?? 
Family F5452
 
28066 Stella's notes: 6 or 7 children
Angeline (Ann) was the youngest child. 
Family F5398
 
28067 Still Born. Paden, Daniel Zur (I31949)
 
28068 Subject: Eli Hockett branch from Iowa Author: Brooke DeMartini Date: 08 Jan 2004 6:44 PM GMT Email:
Eli Hockett b. 1840-ish in Iowa was a drummer boy in the Civil War. He came to California when he was a young man, stopping in Texas for a while. Married to Cornelia or Cynthia (uncertain) and had sons: John Winfield, Frank and Carl, plus more and daughters: Ella, Ethel and more. John W. Hockett was my grandfather. He married Minnie B. Smith who was his cousin once removed, and they had five surviving children, two of which are still living. One is my mother, Lorna. If there is anyone here from this branch of the Hockett family or knows anything about it, please respond or email me. I have access to a lot more information. I also have cousins who give me more information. This geneology stuff is fascinating and I like telling it to my own children and hope that the name is remembered. Unfortunately, the Hockett name has stopped in my branch of the family. John Hockett's two sons had only daughters. Ironically, my father's name has ended as well, as his two sons (my brothers) have only had daughters. I have four sons, but their name is my husband's name.

 
Hockett, Eli (I787)
 
28069 Susan E. Peaden. Peden, Susan Elizabeth (I27298)
 
28070 SW Quarter SE Quarter 40 acres
Township: 17 north
Range: 6 west
Section: 27 
Hotchkiss, Eli Cleveland Sr. (I22127)
 
28071 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Young, Matthew Wayne (I4597)
 
28072 Technician Peden's official Medal of Honor citation reads:
He was a forward «u»artillery observer «/u» when the group of about 45 infantrymen with whom he was advancing was ambushed in the uncertain light of a waning moon. Enemy forces outnumbering the Americans by 4 to 1 poured withering artillery, «u»mortar «/u», machinegun, and «u»small-arms «/u» fire into the stricken unit from the flanks, forcing our men to seek the cover of a ditch which they found already occupied by enemy foot troops. As the opposing infantrymen struggled in hand-to-hand combat, Technician Peden courageously went to the assistance of 2 wounded soldiers and rendered first aid under heavy fire. With radio communications inoperative, he realized that the unit would be wiped out unless help could be secured from the rear. On his own initiative, he ran 800 yards to the battalion command post through a hail of bullets which pierced his jacket and there secured 2 light tanks to go to the relief of his hard-pressed comrades. Knowing the terrible risk involved, he climbed upon the hull of the lead tank and guided it into battle. Through a murderous concentration of fire the tank lumbered onward, bullets and shell fragments ricocheting from its steel armor within inches of the completely exposed rider, until it reached the ditch. As it was about to go into action it was turned into a flaming pyre by a direct hit which killed Technician Peden. However, his intrepidity and gallant sacrifice was not in vain. Attracted by the light from the burning tank, reinforcements found the beleaguered Americans and drove off the enemy.
 
Peden, Forrest E. (I30277)
 
28073 The Final Rolls of the Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory list the names of the individuals who were allowed on the tribal rolls by the Dawes Commission. Source (S2935)
 
28074 The football stadium is named in his honor. Peden, Donald Charles Sr. (I37727)
 
28075 The Fourth Registration, often referred to as the "old man's registration", was conducted on 27 April 1942 and registered men who born on or between 28 April 1877 and 16 February 1897 - men who were between 45 and 64 years old - and who were not already in the military. Source (S2637)
 
28076 The index includes the names of all persons applying for compensation arising from the judgment of the United States Court of Claims on May 28, 1906, for the Eastern Cherokee tribe. The information included on the index is the application number, the name of the applicant, and the State or Territory in which the individual resided at the time the application was filed. Source (S2930)
 
28077 The old county farm was located on what is now the Willie Groce Road, halfway between the Roseville Road and Hwy 63. Farm is now owned by Roger Payne. Only two marked stones, but lots of field stones. It was at this location until about January 1917. (about four miles from present location) Source (S3382)
 
28078 The Peden obelisk was erected in 1891 to mark the spot where "Peden the Prophet" was finally buried. It is the third memorial to mark the grave - the two previous stones still surviving. Made from Aberdeen granite and designed by R. S. INGRAM, the memorial was unveiled on 16th July 1892 by Professor John Stuart BLACKIE.
 
Peden, Rev. Alexander The Prophet (I16743)
 
28079 The Rev. Alexander Peden, the prophet, was born in the parish, 1626.
He had been three years minister of the parish of New Lute, in
Galloway, when he was ejected by the Government with many others of
the Presbyterian clergy. After the battle of Pentland Hills, in
1666, a proclamation was issued by the privy council for his
apprehension, together with other leading Presbyterians. Of those
distinguished for their piety who were apprehended on that occasion,
10 were hanged on one gibbet at Edinburgh, and 35 before their own
doors. But Mr. Peden, with sagacious foresight, found refuge in
Ireland, where he obtained employment at threshing corn with the
flail, until King Charles, apparently alarmed at the diminution of
his subjects, had written a letter to the privy council commanding
them to desist from their horrible work. The hanging being over for
the time, Mr. Peden returned to his sacred calling in Ayrshire,
preaching in the fields, and visiting the sick and the bereaved. But
he was apprehended in Carrick, conveyed to Edinburgh, tried,
condemned, and sent to prison in the stronghold on the top of the
Bass Rock, then used as a State prison for influential Covenanters.
The Bass Rock is a precipitous island standing in the sea at the
entrance to the Firth of Forth, like Ailsa Craig at the entrance to
the Firth of Clyde, but is of smaller dimensions. He was kept there
till 1678, when he was taken out and put on board a ship, with 60
others, to be transported to Virginia. But the cruelty of the
persecutors was not gratified in this instance, for the captain of
the ship, on learning the true character of the gentlemen whom he
had got on board, refused to proceed with such a cargo, and they
were all set at liberty in London. Mr. Peden immediately returned to
his ministerial duties in Ayrshire, where the persecution was raging
at the height of its fury. Claverhouse had let loose over the
district 6000 Highland soldiers-Roman Catholics, if they were
anything-to enter every house and demand food and lodging, to
prevent the Presbyterians from engaging in worship both in and out
of doors, and to search out and apprehend their leading men. Most of
the ministers saved their lives by yielding to break the Covenant in
some important points ; but Mr. Peden yielded nothing: his prophetic
spirit was incorruptible: he was provided with other means of
safety, When again and again the enemy heard of him preaching and
visiting the sick, and again and again scoured the country in search
of him-and there was not a house nor pig-sty where he could have
remained without the certainty of being discovered and shot, or led
to the scaffold-he always foresaw their movements-often, no doubt,
by the assistance of his surrounding adherents-and lodged him-self
safely in a cave near the village of Sorn. The entrance to his cave
was protected against the scent of bloodhounds and other dogs of the
persecutors by a pool of water, and was covered with natural shrubs
and a large willow tree, by the branches of which he swang himself
across the water. According to the history of the time from his
liberation in London till his death, he must have lived in and out
of his cave for seven or eight years. In our Peden, nor in the time
of the Hebrew prophets-for then, as now, "a prophet had no honour in
his own country," and they even "killed the prophets." There is no
doubt, however, that the the Rev. Alexander Peden had a most
wonderfully clear perception of coming events, which made him more
earnestly believed in as a prophet than any other whom Scotland has
ever known; and, though we dare not com-pare him to the prophet
Daniel, he was, nevertheless, an honest prophet. No false prophet
would have borne for one week the sufferings which this poor
faithful minister endured for 20 years. It is comforting to know
that he was preserved from the hands of his enemies to the last, and
died a natural death, in hiding, but not in his cave-for, at a quiet
moment, when he felt his end fast approaching, he crept into his
brother's house, not far distant. His brother, being alarmed at the
danger, suggested that he might be safer in the house of another
brother, at Auchinleck. But he said, "In 24 hours I do not care if
they make a whistle o' my banes," and within that time he had
breathed his last. Died in 1686, aged 60
 
Peden, Rev. Alexander The Prophet (I16743)
 
28080 The tombstone stone of Thomas Estes has his date of death as November 18,1886, aged 87 years. The correct date is August 18, 1886, aged 86 years,as reported in the newspaper at the time. The memorial marker is foursided. To the right of Thomas is his second wife, Irena Estes, died November 15, 1888, aged 74 years. This would make her birthday April 24,1814, as opposed to 1817, as reported in the "Sketch of the Thomas Estes Family." The opposite side to the stone list their son, John R. Estes,died February 10, 1882, aged 37 years. John fell from a horse and struck his head. Estes, Thomas Estridge (I9187)
 
28081 Theodore M Aug 1870, Beckett, Theodore M. (I21546)
 
28082 They had three children. Family F3130
 
28083 This database details those persons enumerated in the 1840 United States Federal Census, the Sixth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1840 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M704, 580 rolls. Each name is associated with two images as the 1840 census schedule was two pages long. Be sure to view the image on which you find your ancestor's name as well as the following image, which should be the continuing census page, in order to obtain all possible information about your ancestor. Source (S349)
 
28084 This database details those persons enumerated in the 1840 United States Federal Census, the Sixth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1840 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M704, 580 rolls. Each name is associated with two images as the 1840 census schedule was two pages long. Be sure to view the image on which you find your ancestor's name as well as the following image, which should be the continuing census page, in order to obtain all possible information about your ancestor. Source (S973)
 
28085 This database details those persons enumerated in the 1840 United States Federal Census, the Sixth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1840 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M704, 580 rolls. Each name is associated with two images as the 1840 census schedule was two pages long. Be sure to view the image on which you find your ancestor's name as well as the following image, which should be the continuing census page, in order to obtain all possible information about your ancestor. Source (S2671)
 
28086 This database details those persons enumerated in the 1840 United States Federal Census, the Sixth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1840 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M704, 580 rolls. Each name is associated with two images as the 1840 census schedule was two pages long. Be sure to view the image on which you find your ancestor's name as well as the following image, which should be the continuing census page, in order to obtain all possible information about your ancestor. Source (S1772)
 
28087 This GEDCOM file has been created from data compiled on www.padenfamily.org. Source (S2239)
 
28088 This is the index to the names of individuals entitled to enrollment on the rolls of the various tribes comprising the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory (Oklahoma). The index entries are arranged by tribe and thereunder by enrollment category (Cherokee By Blood, Cherokee Minor, Cherokee Freedmen, etc.). The entries for each enrollment category are arranged alphabetically by surname. Source (S2934)
 
28089 This land record was originally published in "Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia, 1745-1800. Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County" by Lyman Chalkley.
 
Peden, John Sr. (I5806)
 
28090 This series contains a printed copy, with corrections in ink, of a roll of persons entitled to participate in the award of the 1906 Court of Claims concerning participation in a fund to persons who were Eastern Cherokee at the time of the treaties of 1835 - 1836 and 1845, or to their descendants. It was compiled for the Court by Special Commissioner Guion Miller. Entries for individuals give name, address, position in family, age in 1906, and roll and application numbers.

Arranged in two sections: Eastern Cherokee living east of the Mississippi River; and Eastern Cherokee living west of that river. Within each section the entries are arranged alphabetically by family name, and numbered in order. 
Source (S2929)
 
28091 This series contains the original applications for tribal enrollments under the act of June 28, 1898, as well as supporting documents such as birth and death affidavits, marriage licenses, transcripts of testimony taken by the Commission, correspondence relating to the status of the application, and decisions and orders of the Dawes Commission. Source (S2937)
 
28092 This series contains the original printed census cards annotated with information about persons applying for enrollment under the act of 1898. Cards were prepared for each "family group" and were used by the traveling enrollment parties to record information about the applicants and actions taken by the Commission and the Secretary of Interior. The information generally given for each applicant includes name, enrollment number (if approved for enrollment), age, sex, degree of Indian blood, post office address, relationship to the head of the family group, references to enrollment on earlier tribal rolls, and parents' names. The cards often include annotations about the applicant's birth or death, changes in marital status, references to related enrollment cards, and actions taken. The reverse of the cards relating to applicants as freedmen contain the name of the person who owned the applicant as a slave and the owner of the applicant's parents. Source (S2936)
 
28093 Thomas 43, Beckett, Thomas I (I21417)
 
28094 Thomas 63, Beckett, Thomas I (I21417)
 
28095 Thomas B. Peden. Peden, Thomas B. (I14255)
 
28096 Thomas was the editor of the Lead Hill Sentinel in Boone CO., AR. He also was the County Coroner from 1880-1882. Estes, Thomas Jerome (I12159)
 
28097 Thomas Watson Fain was representative for Fannin County 1857-1858, White County 1888-1889, White County 1898-1889

from "The Official Sketch-Book 1898-99" printed in 1899 on page 101 for his last term as Representative. It reads: "T.W. Fain, Representative from White County, was born in White County, Georgia, in the year 1822. His home is now in Cleveland. By occupation he is a farmer and in politics he is a democrat. He has served three terms in the legislature; he has served as justice of the peace in his county, and in 1861 was captain of the militia. He was opposed in the Democratic primary by William Camel and James Glenn. His majority over the highest of these was 250. In the general election, he was opposed by Cicero Bell, Populist."

1860 Census - 37 yrs old, living at Hot House P.O., Fannin Co., GA with wife Roxanna. His brother William Hollen is living a few houses away. pg 1055

1880 Census - 58 yrs old, living with wife Roxanna and children in Nacoochee, White Co., Georgia. pg 512 B. His son Nicholas is living one house down.

1900 Census - his widow Roxanna is living with her son Jacob and family White Co., Georgia. ED 133, sht 7 B.

Evidently he was awarded a Civil War Pension, but I have not requested it - Not sure if this is him:

Tennessee State Library and Archives Historical and Genealogical Information SOUTHERN CLAIMS COMMISSION -- TENNESSEE : PART 2 (C - F) Name: Fain, Thomas W. County: Jefferson Status: Allowed 
Fain, Thomas Watson (I11484)
 
28098 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Young, Aurora Elizabeth (I4296)
 
28099 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Young, Maddilyn Joy (I2912)
 
28100 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Paden, Donald Edward (I1)
 

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